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Marin Solar and Marin Clean Energy

Leveraging Solar and Marin Clean Energy

Who wouldn’t want to sell something at 37 and buy it back at 5?  Answer:  Everyone, regardless of whether we’re referring to dollars to cents. Here in Marin County, residents can do just that with a Solar System, Net Metering, and Marin Clean Energy.  The towns participating in the program are Belvedere, Corte Madera, Fairfax, Larkspur, Mill Valley, Novato, Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Sausalito, Tiburon, and any unincorporated areas of the County of Marin.  The City of Richmond may soon participate as well.

Of course, certain measures must be taken and analyses made to ensure Marin solar customers can take full advantage of this arrangement.  In order to “sell” energy back to Marin Clean Energy, you need to be producing more power than you are using.  The beauty of this deal is that MCE will pay you the retail rate for the excess power you put back on the grid.  So if you are under the PG&E E7 Time of Use plan, the Peak Summer use rate is $.37/kWh, between 12 and 6pm, Monday through Friday.  That is the time period when your solar system should be most productive, so the excess power you produce can be sold back to MCE for $.37/kWh.  At night, when there is no sun for the solar system, you can purchase the power you need for $.05/kWh.  Detail of this rate plan below:

Residential 7 plan – PG&E equivalent E-7:

SUMMER – Service from May 1 through October 31

Peak………………………………………… $0.370/kWh 12 Noon to 6 P.M. Monday through Friday*

Off-Peak……………………………………. $0.050/kWh All other hours

WINTER – Service from November 1 through April 30

Peak………………………………………… $0.220/kWh 12 Noon to 6 P.M. Monday through Friday*

Off-Peak……………………………………. $0.050/kWh All other hours

 

*DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ADJUSTMENT: The time periods shown above will begin and end one hour later for the period between the second Sunday in March and the first Sunday in April, and for the period between the last Sunday in October and the first Sunday in November.

Now, the $.37/kWh which MCE will pay becomes that much more eye popping when you compare it to the top tiered rate which PG&E charges of $.34/kWh.  Also when compared to the wholesale rate of $.035/kWh, which most Utilities are willing to pay for excess power produced.  Net/net it looks like a pretty darn good deal, of course with one caveat:  PG&E charges inherent in each MCE bill.  MCE charges, or pays, for generation, but PG&E exacts their pound of flesh via charges for transmission and distribution.  How much do they charge and how is it broken out on the bill?  Excellent question and more to follow on that topic in my next Blog…

You can reach Jason Moshonas at [email protected]
Jason lives in and blogs from Marin County, California

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